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buster


Buster Benson

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day five of eighteeen
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buster


Found a freezing cafe with wifi, outlets, big mugs of coffee, and lots of space on W Houston and Greene St called Aroma Espresso Bar.  I've been here 4 hours and am getting hungry.  I wrote the first 400 words of Enjoymentland, did all my bills, caught up on 180 emails, favorited and tagged photos from dB and Misha's awesome wedding and brunch (see Rick's and Kellianne's), updated the software on my iPhone, am installing Installer.app right now to see what that's all about, did some volunteer guerrilla iPhone marketing that happens whenever I'm sitting in public, read a chapter of my new favorite book Adverbs, that I borrowed from silverfae9, and people-watched. 

I have two more hours here.  We were going to go to the gym (I'm feeling a slight bit unhealthy lately with all this good-eaten... need to lose a couple pounds), but left essential gym items at home accidentally (or subconsciously?).

Damn it, the Installer.app thing made me do a recover which erased all my data from it, and I've got no contacts on this laptop to sync with.  STUPID.  I should've known better than to install this while on vacation.  Oh well!  Apologies for not having you in my phonebook anymore!  :(

Now I wanna eat something. 

What do you think about this statement?  Nothing is worth doing unless it's enjoyable.  And, by "enjoyable", I mean enjoyable in at least one of these six ways:
  1. Ego: it strengthens your ego/sense of self, your identity
  2. Sensual: it feels/tastes/sounds/smells/looks good
  3. Healthful: it's somehow healthy, edifying, or supports your ability to physically survive
  4. Social: it is somehow a shared experience
  5. Potential: it saves or stores up money/resources/energy for the future
  6. Intrinsic: it is enjoyable in itself, appreciated for what it is
Things that don't meet one of these criteria, I'm exploring the possibility, might not be worth doing.  And this isn't to say that none of us are doing them... for example, going through tough times in the hopes of one day having them pay off.  But I think there's something to the idea of not going after these future riches that make us miserable now.  I think this thinking might be left over from the days of trying to store up riches in heaven.  Or, stockpile money away in some 401K that you might be better off spending now.  It's a controversial statement that I think most people will disagree with at first glance actually. 

I'm still thinking about it, and don't know if I have the guts to go after this new hedonism.  Is it too cocky?

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And this isn't to say that none of us are doing them... for example, going through tough times in the hopes of one day having them pay off. But I think there's something to the idea of not going after these future riches that make us miserable now. I think this thinking might be left over from the days of trying to store up riches in heaven. Or, stockpile money away in some 401K that you might be better off spending now. It's a controversial statement that I think most people will disagree with at first glance actually.

Well, I think that you need to define the time scale! There are many things that are painful in the short-term which are enjoyable (or allow for enjoyment) in the long term. Breaking up with someone, for example, or working on a degree in medicine can be grueling in the short-term but can have big benefits in the longer-term. We should have a good balance of short-term and long-term plans, though.

But doing things that aren't enjoyable in any term? Not good.

And that picture is really cute. :)

Yeah, long-term versus short-term. I know we create this dichotomy between immediate gratification and delayed gratification. Four quadrants of gratification. Everyone can agree that short-term AND long-term is a winner. And that short-term lameness with long-term lameness is a definite loser. The other two are more up for debate. I'm saying that the other two are losers. That the ONLY quadrant we should strive for is the short-term win/long-term win. Short-term win/long-term loss is short-sighted, and short-term loss/long-term win is needlessly self-punishing.

But of course nobody's going to agree with this on its own. I need to make a better argument, and a longer one.

yikes. at least you have your contacts backed up elsewhere. that was my crucial mistake. are they on a computer somewhere in seattle that could be sent to you?

It's on my imac at home... I'll just have to survive another 13 days with my limited contact list. Sucky.

I figured Adverbs would be right up your alley. Glad you're enjoying it.

I think this list is good.

For instance, today I gave notice at my full-time job--I stayed there until I had saved the resources to have a safety net (in this case I paid my rent though January 2008 and have some money to live off). The reason, I said, was because I got a money wedding photogrpaher gig and want to get more. That's mostly true but I also want to make getting photography jobs half my job, not, like, hating my boss.

err, I gave notice TODAY.

You spent the 4 hours 1 block and a half from our office! Please stop by. 67 Greene St. #3. Wifi, Coffee, power, and lunch are all on me. 646 244 9910

1) Adverbs is pretty funny, huh? Have you read any of his other books? We went and saw him speak and read from it a few weeks ago and he was hilarious!

2) Your theory of enjoyment is severely flawed in the sense that it leaves out doing things that make the world a better place, or improve humanity, whether they are enjoyable in any of those ways or not. Good! ;)

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